adjust your swimming mindset

Adjust Your Swimming Mindset

5 Ways To Adjust Your Swimming Mindset

How You Think About Swimming Is Holding You Back From Achieving Success


Hey Team, it’s Rory here. The biggest obstacle standing in the way of your success in swimming might just be the way you think about swimming.

When you change the way you think about swimming I guarantee you, you will start to get see much quicker improvements! Here are 5 tips to help you get your mind right.

adjust your swimming mindset

1. Accept Your Starting Point

I wish I had learned to handstand when I was a kid. I’m sure you wish you already knew how to swim well, or swim as well as someone else you know. But we didn’t and you can’t (yet).

No doubt you have goals that you would like to achieve, we all do. If you are anything like me those goals are lofty and ambitious. Maybe you want to be a sub 30 minute 70.30 swimmer? Maybe you want to break 2.00/100m. Maybe you just want to make it through your first Triathlon without drowning!

Whatever the goal, the truth is you won’t get there until you accept where you are now. You won’t break 2.00/100m until you’ve swum 2.20/100m or 2.10/100m first.

Most of us want desperately to shortcut the process that will get us to those goals. We want to go from 2.30/100m to 1.30/100m in a week.

But forcing yourself to do things that your body is not ready to do isn’t going to get you there any faster. In fact it’s more likely to make you want to quit or to get you injured.
Regardless of where you wish you were or how good you could have been if you had started earlier, accept where you’re are now. Then build progressively forward from there.

Key Takeaway

“Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can.”
– Arthur Ashe


2. Don’t Compare Your Beginning To Someone Else’s Middle

We assume that swimmers who can swim have always known how to swim. We see someone swimming fast and instantly believe they are a “natural”. That’s an assumption that’s seldom right.

Swimming is a skill. A skill that no one is born with. Anyone that knows how to swim and is comfortable in the water has done so through practice and hours and hours of exposure to the water. Maybe that practice and exposure happened when they were younger, but just as plausible is that it has happened over the last 6 month or year.

Key Takeaway

Swimming is a skill. A skill that no one is born with. Anyone that knows how to swim and is comfortable in the water has done so through practice and hours and hours of exposure to the water.


3. It’s All About Experience

Your beliefs about swimming come from your experience in the water. If you’ve just started out in the sport, chances are you haven’t spent enough time swimming to form useful beliefs. So you believe something that’s not necessarily true.

Picture it: you get hit in the face by some water and you don’t get a good breath in. Then it starts:

“Oh my gosh, I’m out of breath, I have to stop, I’m not going to finish the swim, I’ll miss my goal time, this race/practice is a failure, what are people going to think about me, I’m a failure!”

Theses thoughts define your experience with the water. If you have nothing else to compare it to, it’s true for you. You simply haven’t spent enough time in the water to know better.

By spending more time in it you will begin to see your swimming differently.

What I see with my clients (more than the time they drop and their improved stroke mechanics) is the increase in confidence about swimming and their ability to swim – and that only comes from experience.

Key Takeaway

By spending more time in it you will begin to see your swimming differently.


4. Success Is Fun

Everyone is motivated to do the things we enjoy doing. The things we enjoy doing are also the things we are good at. They are the things that bring us recognition from our friends, our families and the people that we respect in our lives.

If I asked you right now to do something crazy like balance on a tight rope or do a front flip off a 10m diving board, chances are you’d fall flat on your face and you’re unlikely to want to try it again. Tight rope walking is a skill, diving is a skill, swimming is a skill too.

The thing with skills is that it can be learned and mastered. What you’ll discover is that as you get better at a skill you begin to enjoy it more.

As you enjoy it more you do it more.

As you do it more you get noticed and recognized for your mastery of the skill.

And when people start recognizing how good you have become at swimming, all of a sudden your motivation to swim is never a problem again!

Key Takeaway

As you get better at a skill you begin to enjoy it more. As you enjoy it more you do it more. As you do it more you get noticed and recognized for your mastery of the skill.

adjust your swimming mindset

5. Figure Out Why You Want It

Simon Sinek talks about knowing your why and how important it is to your success.

When workouts get tough, when you get tired and want to give up or take shortcuts, your why will keep you going. If you have a good enough reason to want to succeed in swimming, you’ll push through the tough times and you’ll find your success. Find your why.


💁🏽‍♂️ Tell me your WHY?

I love hearing about why people got into Triathlon (especially when they couldn’t swim at all before they started the sport!). So what’s your reason for doing triathlons? For trying to master the swim? Put it down in the comments below or send me an email and let me know!
~ Rory

About The Author


Hey, I’m Rory!
I write and record everything on ICanSwimFast.com. It’s my way of giving back to the sport that gave me so much for so many years. Thanks for reading and hanging out on my site, I hope you’ve found it valuable!

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share a swimming lane

How To Share A Swimming Lane

How To Share A Swimming Lane

A Guide To Lane (and pool) Etiquette

Written by Rory | Technique Advice


Hey, it’s Rory here. So many aspiring triathletes would love to hop into the water at their local gym or community pool. But they are scared to death by the thought of people judging them or getting in somebody’s way.

That ends today. 

I’m going to teach you the etiquette rules of the lane and pool so you can hop in with confidence and start enjoying the water with the rest of us!


This Guide Will Help You Share A Swimming Lane If:

1. You swim slowly and are afraid you’ll get passed often
2. You are embarrassed about number 1 (you shouldn’t be)
3. You think people will get annoyed if you try to swim in their lane
4. You don’t know which side of the lane to swim on
5. You have no idea how to pass someone or be passed or when to push off
6. You’re scared people will judge you for all of the above or you will mess up their workout
7. You simply want to learn good pool & lane etiquette (you legend you!)

If you answered yes to any of those, let’s fix you up so you can get wet! Here’s what you will learn…

Picking a Lane & Lane Speeds
How To Get Into The Lane
Lane Direction & Circle Swimming
Turning In A Circling Lane
Passing People In A Circling Lane
Letting People Pass You In A Circling Lane
Where To Rest At The End Of The Lane
When To Push Off To Start A Length
Other Good Things To Know

Let’s get started!


Picking a Lane & Choosing Your Speed

Almost every pool will require you to share a swimming lane. Some pools designate slow, medium, and fast lanes. If that’s the case, each lane will be demarcated with signs at each end of the pool. If this happens at your pool, simply pick the lane that’s appropriate to your swim speed and get in!

If the lanes are not demarcated, you’ll need to survey the pool for a minute.

Take a look at the people already swimming and find a lane with people who look like they are moving at your speed. Spend a minute or two on the deck. Who’s doing a long slow swim with no rest? Who’s doing short fast sprints with longer rest?

Use your best judgment in picking the lane most appropriate to your speed and the *set you are about to do.

*If you’re going to be kicking or doing drills, pick a slower lane! 

When in doubt start in a slower lane. Leave your ego in the locker room if you need to 🙂

Once you’re in; if you are getting passed regularly, then as a courtesy to the other swimmers you will want to move down to a slower lane. Similarly, if you are consistently passing everyone in your lane you will want to move to a faster lane.

If you are swimming in the fastest lane and you are still consistently passing everyone, time your push offs so you have the the least amount of conflict/passing to do.

Key Takeaway

Use your best judgment in picking the lane most appropriate to your speed and the set you are about to do. When in doubt start in a slower lane.

improve my swimming

How To Join A Busy Lane

When joining a lane, it’s always a good idea to make sure that other swimmers are aware you are there.
To do this you can wait until they stop at the wall for a rest and are able to acknowledge that you are joining the lane.

But what do you do if they are not stopping to rest?

I like to sit down on the side of the deck and let my feet dangle in the water on one side of the lane while they turn. They will usually see your feet and know you intend to join!

Watch the lane for a minute, then time your jump into the water so that it causes no obstruction to the swimmers already in the water. They shouldn’t have to stop or slow down because you are joining the lane.

Key Takeaway

Make sure the swimmers in the lane you are joining are aware you are getting in. Whether they stop or not, give them a heads up the party in the lane is +1.

share a swimming lane

How To Circle Swim & Figuring Out The Lane Flow

Circle swimming is how we avoid collision’s in the lanes. To circle swim, you will simply swim up one side of the line and back down the other.

Some pools will post the directions for circle swimming, but many don’t. If there are no directions posted at your pool, here’s what you do:

1. If there are 3 or more people circle swimming in the lane, note the direction they are circling before you jump in and follow their lead.
2. If there is no one in the lane or only one other swimmer and there are no directions posted, you have two options.

share a swimming lane

a. | Jump in and start to swim on the side of the lane that you would drive on in your county. If you drive on the left side of the road in your county then you will always keep your left side closest to the lane line. If you drive on the right side of the road in your country, then you will keep the lane line on your right side.
b. | Alternatively, it is usually* ok to split the lane. This means you stick to one side while they stick to the other. This works at most pools provided you are aware that you will need to circle should someone else want to join.

*Some pools require you to circle swim at all times regardless of the number of people in the lane – you will know if this is the case because the rules will be posted.

Turning In A Circling Lane

To turn at the wall you’ll want to cut across to the opposite side of the lane just before you get to the approaching wall for your turn. This way you don’t risk pushing off in the wrong direction and getting in someone’s way.

Passing People In A Circling Lane

We always pass in the middle of the pool. Swim up and down the outside of your lane and move to the middle to pass when it is clear up ahead.

Always make sure you have enough time to pass the slower swimmer well before the wall.

Passing mid pool requires some skill and awareness of:

• How fast you are swimming
• How fast the swimmer you are overtaking is going
• If there are any other swimmers approaching in the opposite direction
• How far away the wall approaching wall is.

If you don’t feel comfortable passing mid pool, wait for the person ahead of you to let you past at the wall (see the next point).

Letting People Pass You In A Circling Lane

If you are getting passed mid pool, try to stay as close to the lane line as you comfortably can. You don’t need to wreck your stroke or stop swimming – you have every right to be in the pool. You don’t need to ruin your swim just so they can pass you, you just want to make it easy for them to pass.

No need to slow down to allow them to pass either. Do not speed up or try to race them though! The longer they spend overtaking you the more dangerous the passing becomes. I’ve seen split lips and eye brows, broken noses and dislocated fingers happen in passing accidents gone wrong!

If a swimmer is sitting uncomfortably close behind you or touching your feet as you move down the pool, allow them to pass by stopping at the next wall. Stop just long enough for them to go ahead of you.

You’ll want to stop on the same side of the lane as you were swimming on. The swimmer behind you should cut across to the other side to turn. You can then push off immediately behind them.

Key Takeaway

Above all else, be aware of what other people in your lane are doing. If you are in the correct lane, you have every right to be in the water, sharing the space. Just keep in mind you are sharing the space.

share a swimming lane

Where To Stand When You Rest

If you are going to rest at the end of the lane between repeats (there’s nothing wrong with that at all) don’t stand in the middle of the lane. Rest against the wall in the corner of the lane that you were swimming on when you ended that length.
This will allow the swimmers that are turning to cut across to the other side of the lane and push off without hitting you or having their swim interrupted.
If there is already someone resting against the wall on the side you’ve just swum on, line up behind them against the lane line. Just like the red dots in the below picture. 

share a swimming lane

Key Takeaway

When you’re resting, get out of the way!


How To Time Your Push Off

Once you are done resting on the wall, time your push off so that it causes the least amount of obstruction/conflict to other swimmers. Do not push off the wall immediately before or after another swimmer. Drafting/tailgating isn’t good manners unless you have an agreement with the swimmer you are drafting off!


Other Good Things To Know

Don’t stop in the middle of the pool and stand up or hang on the lane line. Stop at the wall unless it’s an emergency!

Don’t swim like you’re at the start of a triathlon. Do NOT swim over or under other swimmers, it’s dangerous. It’s rude. And embarrassing.

Don’t draft/tailgate. And don’t touch people’s feet more than once to let them know your intention to pass.

Key Takeaway

If you’re unsure, just ask. You could possibly make a friend by simply asking them if I can join their lane. Next thing you know you’re working out with someone and you can push each other.

share a swimming lane

And Finally…

If you’ve read this far and taken it all in and you still feel like people will judge you, know this…

You have every right to be at the pool and to swim up and down the lane as any one else!

Myself and a majority of other competent swimmers and coaches have more respect for the newbie struggling to learn this beautiful sport than competent swimmers half-assing their way through a main set!

Key Takeaway

Welcome to the sport – now get in, start sharing the swimming line you want, conquer it with confidence and get faster!


💁🏽‍♂️ Feeling Overwhelmed? Can I Help?

If you’re struggling to get comfortable sharing a swimming lane with other people, leave me a comment below. I’d be happy to help you out.
~ Rory

Download your copy of this post as a PDF, keep it handy and refer back to it whenever you need.

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share a swimming lane

About The Author


Hey, I’m Rory!
I write and record everything on ICanSwimFast.com. It’s my way of giving back to the sport that gave me so much for so many years. Thanks for reading and hanging out on my site, I hope you’ve found it valuable!

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How To Stop A Triathlon Swim Panic Attack On Race Day

How To Stop A Triathlon Swim
Panic Attack On Race Day


We’ve been talking about the effect that panic has on transferring your speed from the pool to open water.

Panic on race day is one of the biggest reasons why triathletes fail to convert speed from the pool to open water. In the last post I showed you two ways that you can help avoid panic on race day.

But what happens if you do start to panic at some point during the swim on race day?

Here are three ways I deal with panic.

stop triathlon swim panic attack

3 Ways to Calm Down From a Panic Attack On Race Day

1. Clear Your Mind Of Negative Thoughts

Close your mind off to to any negative thinking. Negative thoughts have a habit of spiraling downwards and getting worse. Feeling a little short of breath can quickly lead to thinking you’re in a life threatening situation!

Don’t allow any thoughts that don’t serve you to linger. The easiest way to do that is to be task oriented, which leads us to number 2.

2. Stay Task Focused.

end triathlon swim panic attack

Don’t allow your mind to get overwhelmed by what’s going on around you. Don’t focus on how far you still have to swim. Or the fact that everyone is swimming away from you! It will only make things worse.

Focus on the very next thing that you need to do to get your swim done. It’s usually to take the next breath and start your next stroke.

Do that. Then do it again.

Focus on the things you can control. The things you’ve practiced many times over. Is your body in a good position. Is your hand getting a good catch on the water? Are you sighting well?

You will finish the swim one stroke at a time. So take that first stroke, then the second, then the third.

3. Breathe

If at any point anything doesn’t feel right or you’re not comfortable, check your breathing. Panic and breathing are very closely linked. Re-gain

Make sure you are in control of your breathing and that it is regular and consistent. Calm yourself and center your thoughts. Now you are ready to rock and roll!

Panic attacks prevent many triathletes from reaching their full potential in the water. Learn to love the open water. Your pool speed will transfer over much better when you do!

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Leave me a comment below if this is something you’ve struggled with in the past.
~ Rory

Related Advice & Tips:

I wrote this post as part of a series on swimming well in open water. Read the rest of the posts in the series here:

Part 1: The Six Culprits Of Slow Open Water Times
Part 2: How To Prevent An Open Water Swim Panic Attack Before Race Day
Part 3: How To Stop A Triathlon Swim Panic Attack On Race Day
Part 4: How To Swim Straight In Open Water
Part 5: Wetsuit Tips For Open Water Swimming

About The Author


Hey, I’m Rory!
I write and record everything on ICanSwimFast.com. It’s my way of giving back to the sport that gave me so much for so many years. Thanks for reading and hanging out on my site, I hope you’ve found it valuable!

Share This With A Training Buddy



How To Prevent An Open Water Swim Panic Attack Before You Race

How To Prevent An Open Water Swim
Panic Attack Before You Race


After months in the pool practicing your swim you owe it to yourself to best prepare for the open water on race day.

It sounds obvious, but open water can get the better of you if you are not prepared.

Panic on race day is one of the biggest reasons why triathletes fail to convert speed from the pool to open water.

prevent-open-water-swim-panic

Picture it with me…

Race morning. Start gun blasts and you’re off swimming.

300m into the race you feel it coming.

Oh no, here we go… No…

No, please no….

NO!!!!

PANIC!

You’re out of breath. Your heart feels like it’s pounding out of your chest.

You stick your head up of the water.
You start doing breaststroke.
You try rolling over onto your back or treading water.
Anything to catch your next breath!

At this point the only thing going through your mind is surviving.

While you panic, the rest of the pack swims around you.
Over you, and away from you towards the swim finish.

The triathletes that enjoy the sport the most don’t just survive the open water. They thrive in the chaos and unpredictability of it.

I want your your hard work to transfer from the pool to open water.

how to not open water swim panic

How You Can Thrive In Open Water Instead of Panicking On Race Day

1. Hit the Open Water More Often

Your experience in any given moment is a direct reflection of your understanding about it. You are panicking because you don’t know how to deal with the perceived threat to your survival.

You brain has a funny way of protecting you. When you are unfamiliar with a situation your brain will find any way to get you out, as quickly as it can.

Thing is, your brain doesn’t care much for your ultimate goal when it perceives a threat to your survival. So if returning you to “safety” means stopping, breaststroking or calling the life guard over, your brain will do it!

None of those will help you crush your swim goals though.

The better your understanding of open water, the better decisions your brain will make when it begins to perceive a threat.

Give yourself the chance to experience similar conditions to those you will be racing in. The more familiar you are with situations that arise at the start of a race, the more comfortable you will.

“We don’t rise to the level of our expectations, we fall to the level of our training.”

If you don’t expose yourself to the open water, there is a good chance it will get the better of you on race day. Create more opportunities for understanding and learning. Hit the open water more often and familiarizing yourself with it!

2. Work On Take Out Speed

Going out too hard and fast in the first 200-400m of your race is often the catalyst for a panic attack.

So work on your take out speed during training sets.

Prepare your body for the fast start. Teach it how to settle down into a pace and rhythm without stopping or having to do breaststroke.

The more you practice, the better you will transition from the sprint start to your steady race pace.

Don’t waste the months spent improving your swimming in the pool only to panic on race day. Set yourself up for success by practicing in open water and working on your take out speed.

3. Mentally Visualize and Prepare Before You Race

In 2011 The British Journal of Sports Medicine focused a study on IRONMAN triathletes. The study concluded that conscious thoughts have a direct impact on your performance.

Training your mind is as important as training your body.

How can you train your mind for the swim start?

Identify a situation you fear may happen and write it down.

Now think about where your focus needs to be in order to get through this moment successfully?

Is it your breathing? Is it your posture? Is it your technique? Is it just focusing on yourself and racing your own race?

Write out what you need to do to resolve the issue.

Next, think about what you need to do to trigger your brain to use the solution you have written down.

Maybe it’s a physical cue, or a mantra, maybe some words? It can be anything that will trigger your brain to start the solution you came up with.

Write out all the potential challenges that could arise in your race. Then program your response – don’t leave it to yourself in the moment.

Tell yourself ahead of time – if that challenge comes, this is what I do, so it’s not left to chance!

Don’t let race day panic ruin your swim. Prepare physically and mentally before you even get to the start day.

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Open Water swimming can be nerve racking. If you’ve got a question related to panic attacks in open water, leave me a comment below.
~Rory

Related Advice & Tips:

I wrote this post as part of a series on swimming well in open water. Read the rest of the posts in the series here:

Part 1: The Six Culprits Of Slow Open Water Times
Part 2: How To Prevent An Open Water Swim Panic Attack Before Race Day
Part 3: How To Stop A Triathlon Swim Panic Attack On Race Day
Part 4: How To Swim Straight In Open Water
Part 5: Wetsuit Tips For Open Water Swimming

About The Author


Hey, I’m Rory!
I write and record everything on ICanSwimFast.com. It’s my way of giving back to the sport that gave me so much for so many years. Thanks for reading and hanging out on my site, I hope you’ve found it valuable!

Share This With A Training Buddy



How To Deal With A Bad Swim Workout

Slow Sucky Swim Days

Written by Rory | Swim Fitness Advice


“This trip to the pool was a waste… I’m swimming slow and still have so much left to do. I should give up now… I feel like I am exerting a ton of energy and almost getting nowhere… Why is life so hard? This swim is hell. I hate swimming. I am terrible at it and it never gets any easier.”

Have you ever had this conversation with yourself during a workout?

I bet you have.

We ALL have.

Sucky-Slow-Swim Days (SSSD) happen. They even happen to the very best athletes in the world. They also happen to me and I’m sure they happen to you too.

Your swim success on race day isn’t dependent on avoiding Sucky-Slow-Swim Days (SSSD).

Your swim success on race day is dependent on how you deal with Sucky-Slow-Swim Days (SSSD).

Age Group Triathletes are more likely to have SSSD than swimmers or Pro Triathletes, and here’s why;

The more you swim, the less prone you are to SSSD’s.

When I was training for the 2012 Olympics I was in the pool 11 times a week. We’d get through 25+ hours of water time in those 11 sessions.

My training these days looks A LOT different to what it looked like back then. I don’t have the time nor the motivation to swim for 25+ hours a week. Like many other Age Group triathletes, I swim 3 times a week for roughly an hour.

I’ve noticed something interesting with my own training and see it with my clients too. With the lower total swim time each week, my times are far less consistent than they used to be.

There are a lot more SSSD’s and when they happen, I’m much slower than my goal times!

When training 25 hours a week on a SSSD, I would be 1 second off my 100m goal pace… and I remember feeling so frustrated even with 1 second!

Nowadays, on 3 hours a week, if I’m having a SSSD, I can be between 4-6 seconds off my 100m goal pace!! WTF?!

Last week I had a SSSD. Sunday’s session was bang on. Tuesday’s swim was a nightmare, but Thursday, I was right back on pace!

Why Do SSSD’s Happen?

  • You’ve briefly lost your feel for the water
    • “Feel” is a swimming term that describes how quickly and how much water you can grab. How much water you can hold and push back with each stroke. The more the better! The more you swim (less time between your swim sessions), the more your body will remember the “feel” for the water
  • You’re more fatigued
    • Balancing the training of three sports is tough. Very seldom will you be completely recovered from the training you did the day before. This plays a role on your speed and ability to hit your goal times.
  • Other factors
    • There are countless other reasons why SSSD’s happen to AG Triathletes. Changes in technique. Bad stroke habits that creep back in. Stress from work or life. Lack of sleep. Not eating right. Dehydration. Some of them you can control, others you can’t, but they all play a role.

You Have A Choice To Make On SSSD’s

Regardless of the reason, SSSD’s happen and when they do, you have a choice to make.

Going through my SSSD workout on Tuesday, I could have had that conversation with myself. The “…this trip to the pool was a waste… I’m swimming slow and still have so much left to do. I should give up now…” conversation.

But I didn’t. I pushed through, and I want you to push through too.

SSSD’s can be constructive workouts that make you a better swimmer. Missing your goal times doesn’t always mean that you are wasting you time with a workout.

How To Deal With SSSD’s

Think of your fitness like a savings account at a bank.

Each time you work out you are making a deposit into your account. Over time you’ll build up enough of a reserve to be able to write a nice big cheque on race day.

Let’s say your goal is to deposit $100 into your account every time you workout. When you hit all your goal times, $100 gets deposited and saved.

On some days, you’ll have a SSSD and for whatever reason you miss your goal times. Perhaps you’re stressed at work and didn’t sleep well. Today you only have $50 (or less) to deposit.

You Make The Decision

On SSSD’s, you have two choices:

1. Choose not to make a deposit today.

Because it’s not $100 (which is the goal) you could say, “…this is a waste of time, I won’t make a deposit today”. You then quit your workout and leave without adding any amount at all to your bank account savings.

2. Decide that $50 is better than $0 and make the best of what you’ve got to deposit today.

If you deposit $50 on two days this week, you’ll have $100 saved. Not quite as much as the $200 you might have planned, but 100% more than the $0 you would have had if you quit and left the pool! Whether its money or fitness, it all adds up no matter how small.

Switch Your Focus

Training is not a continuous upward trajectory in a straight line. If you only swim 3 hours a week, you’re not going to have $100 to deposit every time you hit the water.

That is ok! Take the SSSD’s in your stride.

Switch your focus to effort and maintain your intensity. Put forward the best effort you can, today. Deposit whatever you have to offer. Over the long run, with time and consistency, you will be richer and fitter because of it!

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Having a few too many slow sucky swim days? Leave me a comment on what’s happening each time you swim.
~ Rory

About The Author


Hey, I’m Rory!
I write and record everything on ICanSwimFast.com. It’s my way of giving back to the sport that gave me so much for so many years. Thanks for reading and hanging out on my site, I hope you’ve found it valuable!

Share This With A Training Buddy



Chasing The Dream Of An Olympic Games

Chasing The Dream Of An Olympic Games

Written by Rory | Mindset & Goal Setting


This post was published on March 24 2010 while on my journey to South African Olympic Trials and the 2012 Olympic team.

I’ve had this poem stuck up in my room, next to my bed for many years. It was given to me at a swim camp in 2004, not long after I had started training. It inspired me and got me chasing the dream of swimming in an Olympic Games. In the last 6 years it’s traveled with me from Malawi to South Africa, Namibia and now Spokane, Washington. (2018 edit – it’s since travelled with me to Skopje, Macedonia and Dubai in the UAE. ????). 

chasing the dream

I woke up this morning and read it again for the millionth time.

But this time it felt a little different.

There was a more feeling in it. One of realization I think. It was a realization that I am doing the things I want to do. That I am loving doing the things I want to do!

This motivational, “you can do anything you want” positive self talk might turn your bull shit radar on… That’s fair. You could argue “well, you can’t do ANYTHING that you want to do”, and maybe you are right

BUT you’d be surprised at what’s possible. With a little common sense and a healthy does of determination, dreams to become reality. You can wake up the person you want to be, doing the things you want to do. And that’s is exciting.

I haven’t finished chasing the dream yet. I still have a long long way to go. But I had to smile this morning when I realized that I am on the right track. And I that I am enjoying it as much as I thought I would.

So, what’s your goal, what’s your dream? How many steps did you take towards it today?s